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Tuesday, December 20, 2011

First, you have to milk the tiger ...

Note: This recipe has been updated. Please check here for the newer, better version.

*blinks* Hi! Wow, is it December 20th already?

I think at this point, the rest of my SiWC 2011 notes can wait until after Christmas. I have some vacation days coming up and the holidays so far have been crammed with festivities, sword class (where I passed another assessment, yaaay!) and fudgecrafting. The most latter is the topic of this post, because I only make one kind of fudge, and it's been getting a lot of attention lately: tiger butter.  Simply put:

Tiger butter: white chocolate and peanut butter melted together and swirled with milk chocolate.

I've always had a thing for the stuff since I first tried a square of Purdy's Chocolates' version as a kid. It was one of my guilty pleasures. But about five or six Christmases ago, I came across a recipe at Allrecipes.com that seemed simple enough, so I made it (and I would love to find the link to give credit where it's due, but it doesn't seem to be around anymore).

My tiger butter has evolved over the years as I messed with ingredients and proportions. I won't bore you with the nitty gritty details, but suffice to say, this year, I feel that I've perfected the process. And I know what people say about not sharing a secret recipe, but I personally believe that this is something everyone should be able to make, so here it is:


L.S. Taylor's Nomtastic Tiger Butter

Ingredients:

- 4½ cups Foley's White Chocolate Melting Wafers

- 1 cup Foley's Milk Chocolate Melting Wafers
- 1 cup smooth peanut butter
- ¼ cup smooth no-sodium, no-sugar added peanut butter (I recommend Kraft)

Tools required:
- 2 saucepans, one much larger than the other
- 2 spatulas
- 1-2 baking sheets
- Waxed paper

Prepare the baking sheets with the waxed paper. Depending on the desired thinness of the squares and the size of your baking sheets, you'll need either one or two. In the larger saucepan, melt the smooth peanut butter with the white chocolate on very low heat (I don't have a double boiler and you don't need one either). In the smaller saucepan, melt the milk chocolate wafers with the no-sodium, no-sugar added peanut butter.

Stir both mixes frequently, each with their own spatula, to help them melt together, and to prevent them from sticking to the bottom of the pan. When both mixes are completely melted and the mixtures smooth, pour out the white chocolate mixture onto the pans, using the spatula to help spread it out into an even layer. Next, drizzle the milk chocolate mixture over the white. Finally, swirl the mixtures together with a spatula, like so:



Allow your creations to cool, then place flat in the freezer for at least 2 hours. Once frozen solid, break them into shards by peeling back the waxed paper. Dropping the sheet on a solid surface from a height can jumpstart the process, if you don't mind the small mess involved. The size of the pieces can vary and is ultimately up to you.



Best made on a full stomach.

10 comments:

  1. I can no longer eat chocolate unless it's white (curse this damaged body!), but that sounds pretty tasty. Pretty big season over the stove/oven for me too. Soap right now, but I'll be doing cherry cordials, buckeyes, and fudge in the coming days.

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  2. I don't have any Foley's lying around the state. Sigh. Just cheese. Lots and lots and lots

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  3. I'm curious -- why two different kinds of peanut butter?

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  4. Daniel - I recommend trying it sans the milk chocolate. The white chocolate and peanut butter alone make for deliciousness.

    Mud - If you don't have Foleys, you could try any other chocolate melting wafers. They're pretty much all the same.

    Troy - Because the original recipe called for just mixing the milk chocolate straight with the pb/white chocolate mix. That resulted in the fudge breaking off wherever the milk chocolate cut through. So it's a consistency issue. I'd been using sunflower oil to soften the milk chocolate, but then this year I realized the unsalted/unsugared peanut butter would be best, for both flavour and consistency. I don't use regular peanut butter because that overwhelms the fudge. Much more subtle this way. :)

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  5. Finally! The mystery of tiger butter solved! I never did know what you were talking about on all those WIP Madness check-ins - hahaha! Looks yummy!

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  6. Hurray hurrah!!!!! Thank you SO much for this.

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  7. JRo - ooops. Sorry I forgot to elaborate before! Well, now I have. ^__^

    Pam - You're welcome! :D

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  8. Best treat I've ever received from a guest! You made my work a breeze Saturday night...I was craving more...hehe. Thank you! How much would you say the recipe yields?

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  9. Best treat I've ever received from a guest. That made my work Saturday night a breeze...then I craved more...yum yum yum. Thank you! How much would you say your recipe yields?

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  10. Ashley, I tend to make a double batch, but I'd say it yields one of those pails full, plus some to spare.

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